iOS 7 For Schools: Why Durham Academy Doesn’t Use It

  You all have probably heard about iOS 7, its cool fingerprint-reading software akin to that of the James Bond movies, and its new ergonomic layout. What you may not have heard about is its poor reputation with schools around the world. On September 18, the Los Angeles County Schools, the second-largest school district in the country, took away all the shiny new iPads that had been updated to iOS 7. Shortly afterward, Apple released iOS 7.0.1, a bug fix for the problematic fingerprint-reading software, but there were even further problems, so Apple hurried together iOS 7.0.2. Mr. Schaefer, our technology coordinator, has taken this lesson and decided not to upgrade to iOS 7. Long live iOS 6!

An iPad with iOS 7 installed. Photo source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/75829045@N05/9862359965

An iPad with iOS 7 installed. Photo source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/75829045@N05/9862359965

Other sources (you never know what you might find on the Internet): k12research.com, gottabemobile.com

Using Google Docs on iOS Device – Eureka!

Cross posted at http://528tech.edublogs.org/

Google Search

Those of you who have been reading this blog since the iPad was announced have read my posts about the issues with using Google Apps for Education on an iOS device. Sure you could sort of use them if you were willing to do equal parts troubleshooting and lowered expectations. I have tried various apps that purport to be the best with being able to connect to our Google Apps for Education accounts to create, edit, share and use without limitations or at least few limitations. Most of the apps come close but when any number of students report having lost work, I believe the system is not a true system. Granted in baseball, .400 is a good average, but if you only have 40% of the work you did, you would agree it is not a system.

Because of this issue, I have been concerned about what we would loose from our normal educational routine if our school adopted iPads for students over laptops since there is virtually no issues with Google Apps for Education from a non-mobile computer. While I am still not sure what is the best device, I have been able to solve the main issue with creating, editing, and sharing Google Apps on an iOS device. I used the new Google Search app and clicked on Applications to select Documents. Once I did this, I could do in iOS what I can also do on a non-iOS device. The only caveat yet to overcome is that when the document is shared with another user they can not see who has shared it with them. Until that is resolved, yes I am talking to you Google, students or teachers may need to add their first name to the title of the document.

If you have yet to update to the new Google Search App, [iTunes Link] do so now as it is really slick with other features as well.